Managing Attributes

As mentioned in other sections, folders don't just store files, they also contain important information about the data within the files and the preferences for how to onboard them. This section covers the process for using attributes to define the data within the files of a folder.

Attribute Setup Process

Within the attribute management section of a specific folder, you can view, add, delete, edit, and arrange attributes. All folders must have every single attribute defined explicitly and correctly in order to successfully onboard data into Salesforce Audience Studio in the desired format. The process for setting up attributes is as follows:

  1. Specify all attributes that exist in the file
  2. Ensure each attribute has the correct settings
    1. Data Type
    2. Name
    3. Profile
    4. Additional Settings
  3. Ensure attributes are ordered exactly as they appear in the file
  4. Address any errors that exist
  5. Proceed to file management

 

Manage Attribute Navigation - Specific Organization >> Folders >> Specific Folder >> Update Folder

Manage Attributes - Specific Organization >> Folders >> Specific Folder >> Update Folder >> Attributes

Add Attribute - Specific Organization >> Folders >> Specific Folder >> Manage Attributes >> New Attribute

Attribute Data Types

The data type should be the first thing set when adding a new attribute as some settings are inherited directly from the data type. Accurately defined data types are extremely important for three reasons.

  1. Ensuring data is parsed correctly
  2. Ensuring data is privacy policy compliant
  3. Ensuring quality match rates

For example, if you defined the gender attribute as a numeric data type, none of the data for that attribute would end up in Audience Studio because the DMZ would not expect to encounter text ("male") in the values for that attribute. As a result of this parsing error, the file would have to be reprocessed in order for the gender attribute to make it to Audience Studio.

Policies around what constitutes PII and/or sensitive data are always changing and vary by region, making it difficult to stay current with standards. Salesforce is extremely watchful of these changes and uses data types to flag attributes that should not be pushed to Audience Studio, or those which are non compliant and need to be purged from the DMZ. This use of data types helps keep everyone compliant in their use of the product.

Finally, data types are helpful in ensuring the best possible match rates. For example, there are data types specific to each component of an address which are used for postal onboarding. However, if a file has a postal address but it is defined as a string instead of using the address specific data types, it would not be used for postal matching, ultimately reducing match rates.

 

There are over 50 different data types, so they are organized by category to make it easier to navigate the list in the UI.

Category
Data Type Name
Data Type Code
Profile Options
Fixed Name
Additional Settings
Attributes Additional State additional_state User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Additional City additional_city User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Age age User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Age as Year of Birth age_yob User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Constant Value constant User / Transaction No Downcase, value
Attributes Date date User / Transaction No Downcase, Input Format, Field Parts
Attributes Date of Birth As Age dob_age User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Day of Month day_of_month User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Day of Week day_of_week User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Gender gender User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Attributes Lower-case String lowercase User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Month month User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Numeric numeric User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Price price User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Range range User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes String string User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes True/False boolean User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Upper-case String uppercase User / Transaction No Downcase
Attributes Year year User / Transaction No Downcase
Client Match Keys Customer Account Number account_number Match Key No N/A
Client Match Keys Identifier id Match Key No N/A
Client Match Keys Audience Studio  User ID kuid Match Key No N/A
Client Match Keys User ID userid Match Key No N/A
Email Match Keys Email MD5 email_md5 Match Key Yes N/A
Email Match Keys Email SHA1 email_sha1 Match Key Yes N/A
Email Match Keys Email SHA256 email_sha256 Match Key Yes N/A
Email Match Keys Email Unhashed email Match Key Yes N/A
Mobile Match Keys Android Advertising ID aaid Match Key Yes Downcase
Mobile Match Keys Apple IDFA idfa Match Key Yes Downcase
Mobile Match Keys Device Identifier device_id Match Key No Downcase
Postal Match Keys Address address Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Address Line 1 address1 Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Address Line 2 address2 Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys City city User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Country country User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Delivery Point Code dpc Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Delivery Point ID dpid Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys First Name first_name Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Full Nanme full_name Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Last Name last_name Match Key Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Phone MD5 phone_md5 Match Key Yes N/A
Postal Match Keys Phone SHA1 phone_sha1 Match Key Yes N/A
Postal Match Keys Phone SHA256 phone_sha256 Match Key Yes N/A
Postal Match Keys Phone Unhashed phone Match Key Yes N/A
Postal Match Keys Postal Code postal_code User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys State state User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Postal Match Keys Zip+4 zip4_postal_code User / Transaction Yes Downcase
Rejected Attributes Credit Card credit_card Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Drivers License drivers Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Facebook Handle facebook Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes IP Address ip_address Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Ignored ignored Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes MAC Address mac_address Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Passport passport Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Skype Handle skype Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Social Handle social Rejected Data No N/A
Rejected Attributes Social Security Number ssn Rejected Data Yes N/A
Rejected Attributes Twitter twitter Rejected Data Yes N/A
Transaction Fields Transaction Amount txamount Transaction No Downcase
Transaction Fields Transaction Date txdate Transaction No Downcase
Transaction Fields Transaction Quantity txquantity Transaction No Downcase
 

Attribute Names

Attribute names must be all lowercase, without special characters, and a maximum of 100 characters. The UI will prompt you to make changes if the name does not conform with the system requirements. The attribute name does not have to match what is in the file, but whatever the attribute is named in the DMZ is what will be shown in Audience Studio. In some cases, the attribute name is not editable; these cases are relatively few and mostly apply to match keys or other data types which would not need a free-text name.

 

Best Practice:

It is recommended that after attributes are named and files are being onboarded that they are not changed. While you can edit the attribute name after onboarding starts, it can result in messy outcomes. For example, let's say you onboard a file from "folder 1" that has an attribute called "sports lovers". The data will show up in Audience Studio with that name. Two weeks later you change the attribute name in the DMZ to "sports fanatics". All subsequent files will be onboarded into a new attribute in Audience Studio with the name "sports fanatics", but the original attribute ("sports lovers") will still exist and some of the users will be in the old attribute while all new ones will be in the new attribute.

 

Attribute Profiles

Attribute profiles define to which part of Audience Studio the attribute should be sent or if it should be sent at all. There are four attribute profiles that exist within the DMZ.

 

Two of the profiles are automatically set based on the selected data type.

 

 Match Key - The sole purpose of match keys is to help generate a match and nothing else. Attributes with this profile will never be sent to Audience Studio. 

 Rejected Data - Attributes with this profile will never be sent to Audience Studio, and in some cases will be deleted immediately from the DMZ.

 

Two of the profiles can be set by you based on where you want the data to show up in Audience Studio.

 

 User Attribute - Attributes with this profile will show up as user attributes in Audience Studio.

Transaction Attribute - Attributes with this profile will show up as transaction attributes in Audience Studio. Some data types are specific to transactions and will automatically inherit this profile. Note, this profile is only made available to customers who have purchased transaction segments.

 User & Transaction - A single field can have both user and transaction profile assignments. When this is the case, the same attribute will be put into both parts of Audience Studio.

 

Additional Attribute Settings

Some attribute data types have additional things that can be specified. The possible settings for each attribute are listed above in the attribute details section.

  1. Downcase - this should be used to convert all characters for every value in the attribute to lowercase. This might be useful for aesthetic purposes in the UI.
  2. Input Format - this allows you to define the way the date is structured in the file so that it is interpreted correctly.
  3. Field Parts - this allows you to specify which parts of the date you would like to create additional attributes for. 
    1. Day
    2. Month
    3. Year
    For example, if you select "month", there will be a date attribute, as well as a month attribute. The month attribute will be created from the date.
  4. Value - if your file only has a list of emails (or other match keys) that do not get ingested into Audience Studio, you can hard code a value for the attribute.

 

Attribute Order

The order of attributes is extremely important. The ordering of the attributes in the DMZ UI must exactly match the order of the attributes as they exist in the columns of the file. Additionally, there should not be any skipped columns. If you have a column in your file that you would not like to have ingested into Audience Studio, you can do this by setting the data type to "ignored".

 

Special Instructions For Krux Format

If you are using the Krux format to onboard data, there are a couple of important amendments to the steps defined above.

  1. The attribute order is of no significance in the Krux format as long as all attributes are defined and properly configured.
  2. All attributes in the file must exactly match the names of the attributes in the folder settings.
  3. Don't forget to set the "Attribute Key" in the folder settings after you are finished updating the all the attribute data types.

 

Match Key Best Practices

There are numerous fields that can be used to create matches for a given user. However, there are some best practices that should be observed.

 

Email Match Keys:

The Krux identity solution works on SHA256 unsalted email address - this is the supported hashing method for email addresses in the native matching infrastructure within Audience Studio*, and SFMC integrations.* However, it is recommended that you upload files keyed against plain text email. This reduces the chances of errors in email hashing during file creation. 

 

Postal Match Keys:

There are many fields that can be used to define a postal address. We recommend using, at a minimum, the following data types for a postal address to ensure the best match rate outcomes:

 

Data Type
Values
Notes
First Name Place first name here Use this as opposed to the "Full Name" data type
Last Name Place last name here Use this as opposed to the "Full Name" data type
Address Line 1 Place the house number, direction, street name, street type, and the street post-direction. Use this field as opposed to the "Address" data type with the full address
Address Line 2 Use this to identify the apartment/unit, or suite number. Use this field as opposed to the "Address" data type with the full address
City Use this to define the city associated with the address. Use this field as opposed to the "Address" data type with the full address
Postal Code Use this to define the 5 digit U.S. postal address. Please include all leading zeroes where applicable. N/A
Phone Unhashed Use this to define the 10 digit U.S. phone number. Do not include any extra characters outside of the number (dash, parentheses etc.). N/A

 

Client Match Keys:

You can upload data using a proprietary client ID, though it is not recommended. As mentioned above, we recommend implementing the native matching infrastructure with SHA 256 unsalted hashed email. However, if you choose to use a client specific identifier, please ensure the following.
  1. The value is being collected through the DTC code on page.
  2. The data type in the DMZ UI matches one of the Client Match Key data types.
    1. User ID
    2. Identifier
    3. Customer Account Number
  3. The name of the attribute as collected through DTC matches the attribute name in the DMZ UI EXACTLY (case sensitive).

Using Multiple Match Keys:

You can include multiple match keys if that is desired. For files that have multiple match keys, the system will attempt to make a match against each key that you provide for each record that is submitted.
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